Frequently Asked Questions

Q.
A.
How often should I brush?
It is important to brush three times a day with ADA-endorsed fluoride
toothpaste. Replace your toothbrush every three or four
months or sooner if the bristles become frayed or worn.
Children's brushes may need to be replaced more often.
Q.
A.
How often should I see a dentist?
We recommend every six months. Regular dental visits allow problems to be resolved before they become severe. Time is very important when it comes to tooth decay. Left undetected, a cavity will grow until it hits the nerve and causes pain, costing more money for treatment options such as root canals, crowns, or even tooth extractions.
Q.
A.
How old should children be when they first see a dentist?
As soon as the first tooth appears, begin cleaning by wiping with a clean, damp cloth daily. When more teeth come in, switch to an infant-sized soft tooth brush . Begin using a pea-sized amount of toothpaste with fluoride when the child is two years old and the first dental exam should be between two and three years.
Q.
A.
How do I avoid having sensitive teeth?
Teeth whitening and tartar control toothpaste as well as baking soda are very abrasive and can cause sensitivity. Instead, use a fluoridated toothpaste without any additives or try products that are made especially for sensitive teeth such as Sensodyne toothpaste.
Q.
A.
How does smoking affect my teeth?
Countless studies show the correlation between tobacco and poor oral health. Don't smoke.
Q.
A.
I brush my teeth regularly. Why should I floss?
Many people think flossing isn't necessary if they brush well, but floss reaches where the toothbrush can't. Although flossing can be awkward at first, stick to it. Your gums may bleed or be tender or sore for the first several days that you floss. As the plaque is broken up and the bacteria are removed, your gums will heal. If the bleeding doesn't stop, notify your dentist. Remember — always be gentle when inserting floss between the teeth and under the gum line. The ADA recommends cleaning between the teeth with floss or inter-dental cleaners once a day to remove plaque.
Q.
A.
Is there a connection between my oral health and my bodily health?
According to the Mayo Clinic, "Gum disease can let bacteria enter your bloodstream and wreak havoc elsewhere in your body. Or sometimes, signs of a disease may first show up in your mouth." Another important reason for regular dental checkups!
Q.
A.
What implications do medications have on oral health?
Certain prescriptions and over-the-counter drugs can reduce the amount of saliva that you produce, resulting in dry mouth. Pregnant women, diabetes sufferers, and cancer patients may also experience oral problems such as inflammation and dry mouth. Make sure to keep your dentist informed about your health status and any medications you take.
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